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Photo Post Fri, Jun. 14, 2013 20 notes

elenorfist:

Here it comes the special, reblog what do you want, Miguel will be dramatically touch his instrument until we reach the 20 fav and reblogs >,<

elenorfist:

Here it comes the special, reblog what do you want, Miguel will be dramatically touch his instrument until we reach the 20 fav and reblogs >,<




Video Post Fri, Jun. 14, 2013 35 notes

ondenaguer:

Manly Scream

~Anuski~





Text Post Fri, Aug. 10, 2012 4 notes

The Golden Ratio and the Fibonacci sequence

     The Golden ratio and the Fibonacci sequence are very interwoven in one aspect, the Golden Spiral. I will not go deep into the matter of these two, since they are still too complicated for my understanding, but I will present you a fact that has been particularly interesting to me. 

     The Golden ratio, usually substituted by phi (φ), is best described as this: a golden ratio is found in the golden section, a segment divided in two using the golden ratio, this will be true if the sum of line a (longer line) plus line b is to line a as line a is to line b. a+b:a as a:b. That proportion makes up phi, the golden ratio, which estimates to 1.61803398874989. 

      If you take a rectangle, divide the rectangle into a smaller one inside, the smaller rectangle must have proportion to the bigger rectangle, the proportion must be phi, and continue that until you can’t see the rectangles, then draw an arc from one vertex to its opposite, and continue it with the next rectangle, you will have a golden spiral. 

     There are other ways to explain it. If the long side of the rectangle is phi, and the short side is 1, when you draw a square inside the rectangle of sides 1, you will have as a residue a golden rectangle. This is true for all rectangles that are proportionate, if you follow the golden ratio. 

      The Fibonacci sequence can be used also. The Fibonacci sequence is a numerical sequence that is as follows: the sum of the last two numbers equal the next number. 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55… To build a spiral, now called a Fibonacci spiral, you need the Fibonacci tiling. This is basically two one-unit squares adjacent to each other, on one of the sides a two-unit square, which build a rectangle, on the side of this rectangle a three-unit square, which build a bigger rectangle, and on its side a five-unit square, and so on and so on. Which will look something like this: 

      After that you only have to draw an arc from one corner to the opposite corner and continue it until you have a spiral. 






Photo Post Thu, Aug. 09, 2012 12,057 notes

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 8:
 
The highest goodness resembles water
Water greatly benefits myriad things without contention
It stays in places that people dislike
Therefore it is similar to the Tao
 
Dwelling with the right location
Feeling with great depth
Giving with great kindness
Speaking with great integrity
Governing with great administration
Handling with great capability
Moving with great timing
 
Because it does not contend
It is therefore beyond reproach

Tao Te Ching: Chapter 8:

 

The highest goodness resembles water

Water greatly benefits myriad things without contention

It stays in places that people dislike

Therefore it is similar to the Tao

 

Dwelling with the right location

Feeling with great depth

Giving with great kindness

Speaking with great integrity

Governing with great administration

Handling with great capability

Moving with great timing

 

Because it does not contend

It is therefore beyond reproach

(Source: bookmania.me, via samsaranmusing-deactivated20140)




Quote Post Sun, Aug. 05, 2012 2 notes

“Their embrace had been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the Party. It was a political act.”


George Orwell (1984) 





Margin Buying

     Margin Buying. Its simply buying securities with money borrowed from a broker, while using other securities as collateral. Why do I dedicate a post to this? You’ll find out. 

     Today there are minimum margin requirements, which require that the margin be larger than the loan. This is so that the broker is protected against the default in payment if the investor can’t pay after a fall in value of the bought securities. 

      That is now. In the 1920’s, which were characterized by the rise of stock exchange between the working class, the requirements were loose, and brokers only asked for a tenth of the loan as collateral. That meant that when the market started to contract, and people received margin calls, which meant that their margin was below the minimum margin requirements, people started selling their other securities to deal with the margin. That was because they needed to replenish their margin or the broker would sell their margin securities, so that he wouldn’t lose any money. Unexpected margin calls can cause a domino effect and effectively crash an asset class. Since a lot of people can’t cover the margin, they are lead slowly in a downward spiral. If I said that this happened in the 1920’s, what do you think is the importance of this?

       This was one of the main contributors to the Great Depression, since people had more debts than they could pay because of the market devaluation and the margin calls. 

      If you need to say or ask something, don’t hesitate. 






A bit of Arab history

      A bit of Arab history, for the curious ones. 

     Muhammad was born by the end of the 6th century, and in the 7th century founded the Islamic religion. This unified the whole of the Arab peninsula, which then went on a conquering spree all over the north of Africa, and almost Europe. (I already mentioned that from 611 to 1492 there was a war in Spain against the more invaders, which the Catholic kings won). While the whole of Europe was engulfed in the Middle Ages, which were a time of cultural, economic and social stagnation, the Arab kingdom was on the rise. They established the Caliphates, monarchies all in unity with the Islamic community, Ummah, with the same religion and culture. In order these were, the Four Orthodox Caliphates, elected by the religious community, Omeya Caliphate, with its capital in Damascus, Abbasi Caliphate, bringing the Islamic religion to the east, Fatimi Caliphate, with its capital in Cairo, Caliphate of Cordoba or Al-Andalus, located in Spain, and the Ottoman Caliphate.

     Yes, the one who blocked trade routes in the 15th century, invaded the decaying Byzantine empire through the Anatolia peninsula and the one from Assassin’s Creed. The Ottoman empire grew to its time of splendor in the 15th century, by the end of the 17th century the Ottoman empire had begun decaying, and by WWI it couldn’t hold together. And it wasn’t until the 19th century that Europe started recolonizing the North of Africa. The Ottoman empire finally collapsed in 1924, and became the Republic of Turkey. Egypt was of the English, Morroco was of the Spanish and French, Western Sahara of the Spanish, Mauritania of the French, Libya of the Italians, Northern Sudan of the English, Syria  of the French, Lebanon of the French, Jordanian of the English, Iraq of the English, Somalia of the Italians, French and English. 

     After 1924, all the countries started a process of independence that led to the organization they have today, as of 1945. Even though, in the next decades they would all suffer coups and state of emergency declaration which would help the rules perpetuate their rule and lead, ultimately, to the Arab Spring. 

      Comments and questions are really welcome!






Text Post Thu, Aug. 02, 2012 4 notes

Telomeres

     Telomeres are basically the hat found at the end of chromosomes. They are formed by the same nucleic acids as the DNA, but their function isn’t of being part of the genetic code. They prevent the genetic code from fusing with other parts of DNA, and from wearing out. 

     The only cells in the human body that contain telomerase (the enzyme that create telomeres) are stem cells and some white blood cells. This said, its safe to say that human cells, somatic cells, do not contain telomerase, thus, they do not create telomeres. The fixed amount of telomeres accounts for a fixed amount of cell division. So when we get to a certain time in our life, our cells stop dividing, and we start wearing out, dying of old age.

     Just theorysing (or something) here, but, if we injected a bit of telomerase into our bodies, in order to create telomeres, wouldn’t that make us live healthier, longer? Of course, that is dangerous, because cancer cells also have telomerase, which account for their fast duplication. But we shouldn’t let fear get the best of us, and study this.

     You can still ask anything you want.    






Video Post Wed, Aug. 01, 2012 14 notes

samsaranmusing:

That strange looking “device” is a scanning electron microscope (SEM) photograph of a bacteriophage, a type of virus. It looks more like a machine than an organism and machine it is. It is a hypodermic needle on an atomic scale. The cap contains DNA. The shaft is used to penetrate the cellular membrane and inject the virus DNA into bacterium reprogramming the cell to make more viruses. The “legs” attach it to the bacterium while the job is done.

A virus has no sensory apparatus and even if it did it wouldn’t work because it has no nervous system. Yet, somehow, our friend the bacteriophage locates its victim, maneuvers into position, latches on and injects its DNA. How? Nobody knows. Ask a biologist and they will mumble about “Brownian motion” and then they will grudgingly admit that they don’t know but then hasten to add “there must be a scientific explanation but we haven’t found it yet”. Fair enough. The sheer volume of what we do not understand about the natural world is overwhelming. We, for all of our sophistication, for all our conceit, know just the tiniest fraction of what there is to be known

Interesting how viruses are so life-like, but aren’t considered alive. 

(via samsaranmusing-deactivated20140)



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